Adele M. Stan

Adele M. Stan is a columnist for The American Prospect. She is the winner of the 2017 Hillman Prize for Opinion & Analysis Journalism.

Recent Articles

THE PRESIDENTIAL RACE IS GETTING INTERESTING.

THE PRESIDENTIAL RACE IS GETTING INTERESTING. In Pakistan, that is. There, the Supreme Court, headed by the recently restored Chief Justice Iftikhar Mohammad Chaudhry , has cleared the way for the immediate return to Pakistan of former Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif , whom Gen. Pervez Musharraf removed in 1999 in a bloodless coup. Musharraf had forced Sharif into a 10-year exile, which he's been taking in Saudi Arabia. In elections widely believed to have been rigged, Musharraf "won" Pakistan's presidency in 2002. Sharif is a rival not only to Musharraf, but also to former Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto , who is said to be the U.S. choice for a power-sharing arrangement with Musharraf. Already compromised by his alliance with the U.S. in the so-called "War on Terror," Musharraf was recently weakened further by the unrest that followed his removal of Chaudhry from the Supreme Court; clashes spread across the country, forcing him to return the chief justice to the bench. Word was that...

FIRST TO GO.

FIRST TO GO. Were there ever any doubt about the Bush administration's contempt for the U.S. Constitution in general, and the First Amendment in particular, two stories from the morning papers stick it right in the reader's face -- not that we'd be inclined to do anything about it. An extraordinary piece by the Washington Post 's Peter Baker tells of a White House manual for dealing with protesters at presidential appearances. The manual was released by the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU), which got hold of it as evidence in a case brought against the federal government by a West Virginia couple who were arrested for wearing tee shirts bearing anti-Bush messages to a Bush event for which they had tickets. Among the tactics outlined in the manual is the creation of "rally squads" who will surround and obscure demonstrators from the cameras. While other attendees of presidential events are forbidden to carry any form of sign or banner, these form the rally squad's arsenal. "These...

PETRAEUS TO REPORT ON SEPTEMBER 11th.

PETRAEUS TO REPORT ON SEPTEMBER 11th. Today, listening to the radio, I heard reiterated what the National Review reported yesterday after a media conference call with Republican presidential kinda hopeful Sen. John McCain : that Gen. David Petraeus will testify before the Senate about the contents of his vaunted report (which, according to whom you believe, he may or may not write himself ) on September 11. A caller to the Diane Rehm Show today asked Rehm's panel of defense policy experts -- Michael O'Hanlon of the Brookings Institution, former Assistant Secretary of Defense Lawrence Korb of the Center for American Progress and Washington Post reporter Jonathan Weisman -- about the unseemliness of the timing, and all concurred that it was simply a matter of complications regarding the congressional schedule. Perhaps so (I'm not yet convinced), but I really think it should be rescheduled to any other day; I don't care if it's a Sunday. The administration has exploited the pain of that...

SEPARATION ANXIETY.

SEPARATION ANXIETY. Like my colleague Sam Boyd , I was quite entertained by yesterday's Rove -a-thon on the Sunday talk shows. While brother Sam duly noted perhaps the most amusing iteration of Rovian grandiosity ("I'm Beowulf; I'm Grendel), I found myself most riveted by the former deputy chief of staff's interpretation of the U.S. Constitution. For Rove, not only does the Constitution live, so do its founders, who apparently speak to him from the beyond, granting new powers to his favorite branch of government. On Meet the Press , he explained to David Gregory just why he would not testify before Congress: KARL ROVE: We have a constitutional separation of powers. The founders talk about this. They, they understood this issue, and they wanted to insulate the judicial, the executive and the legislative from each other in this respect. Wait; it gets better: KARL ROVE: It should not— -- the Constitution should not be weakened, and we should not weaken the prerogatives of the power of...

IS ROVE OFF THE HOOK?

IS ROVE OFF THE HOOK? He may have used the personnel and apparatus of taxpayer-funded government agencies for partisan political purposes, but even if that's proven beyond a reasonable doubt, and in violation of the law, Karl Rove 's imminent exit from the West Wing may just let him off the hook. As I reported earlier this week, among the many fingers pointing at Rove is one belonging to Scott J. Bloch , director of the Office of Special Counsel, which administers the provisions of the Hatch Act, a 1939 law that regulates the role of government employees in electoral politics. Detailed here by CQ's Shawn Zeller, Bloch's investigation has come as close as any to really nailing Rove, having turned Rove's special e-mail account with the Republican National Committee (RNC), which he apparently used to communicate with government employees at their "dot-gov" e-mail addresses. But that, even when leveraged by investigations by the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform (led by...

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