David Dayen

David Dayen is a contributing writer to Salon.com who also writes for The InterceptThe New Republic, and The Fiscal Times. His first book, Chain of Title, about three ordinary Americans who uncover Wall Street's foreclosure fraud, was released by The New Press on May 17, 2016.

Recent Articles

Our Bankrupt Policy for Puerto Rico

The restructuring of the island’s debt allows no role for the Puerto Rico’s government.

AP Photo/Ricardo Arduengo, File
AP Photo/Ricardo Arduengo, File The Puerto Rican flag flies in front of the Capitol building in San Juan. T he endgame for Puerto Rico’s debilitating fiscal crisis has begun. Unable to manage a $74 billion debt that has accompanied a decade of recession, spikes in poverty, and a mass exodus of citizens, the island will now turn to federal courts to approve a resolution with its creditors. But in many ways nothing has changed for Puerto Rico. The congressionally-imposed fiscal oversight board, known locally as the junta , remains in control as lead negotiator in restructuring talks. Whether Puerto Rico’s three million citizens get a fair deal or a continuation of harsh austerity depends almost entirely on seven unelected, unaccountable technocrats. Frustrating journalists everywhere, what Puerto Rico did on Wednesday cannot be called “bankruptcy,” because Congressional Republicans who passed last year’s PROMESA law didn’t want to be saddled with such language. But the process under...

Merge, Bail, and Make Out Like a Bandit

Yahoo’s Marissa Mayer is just the latest CEO to fail at her job, see her company merged, and float away on a huge golden parachute.

(Photo: AP/Eric Risberg)
(Photo: AP/Eric Risberg) Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer on February 18, 2016 C orporate America prides itself on rewarding success and punishing failure. Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer does not fit comfortably into that narrative. During her five-year tenure at the once-proud tech firm, user levels stagnated , ad revenue dropped , acquisitions cratered , layoffs accelerated , product quality floundered , and hackers stole the personal information of more than one billion users. But when Yahoo’s sale to Verizon becomes official in June, with the restructured company renamed Oath , Mayer will walk away with $186 million , according to a regulatory filing released this week. That includes shares of Yahoo stock Mayer owned, stock options, and a $23 million “ golden parachute ” of cash, restricted stock units, and medical benefits. Mayer did relinquish $14 million while taking responsibility for the Yahoo Mail data breach, but she’ll get 13 times that amount just to no longer remain part of the company...

Tesla Workers File Charges with National Labor Board as Battle with Elon Musk Intensifies

Employees fight back as Tesla ramps up anti-union policies.

AP Photo/Jeff Chiu
AP Photo/Jeff Chiu Tesla employees at the company's Fremont, California, factory. Capital & Main is an award-winning publication that reports from California on economic, political and social issues. The American Prospect is co-publishing this piece. W orkers at Tesla’s Fremont, California, electric car factory have filed an unfair labor practice charge with the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB), accusing the company of illegal surveillance, coercion, intimidation, and prevention of worker communications. The employees, who have been attempting to organize the approximately 7,000 workers at the plant through the United Auto Workers, claim that Tesla violated multiple sections of the National Labor Relations Act, which protects the right to unionize. “I know my rights, and I know that we acted within them,” said Jonathan Galescu, a body repair technician. Galescu and his colleagues have previously cited low pay, hazardous work conditions, and a culture of intimidation as...

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