Gabrielle Gurley

Gabrielle Gurley is The American Prospect’s deputy editor.

Recent Articles

Mayors See Right Through the American Health Care Act

The Republicans’ bill is not exactly a “beautiful picture” for cities.

(Photo: AP/J. Scott Applewhite)
(Photo: AP/J. Scott Applewhite) House Speaker Paul Ryan makes his case on March 9 for the GOP's repeal-and-replace plan for the Affordable Care Act. I t’s difficult to underestimate the relief provided by the Affordable Care Act to American cities and their mayors. Mayors, after all, hear about local health issues from everyone—from first responders and uninsured constituents to doctors and hospital executives. As the mayors see it, Obamacare has reduced the numbers of uninsured people using hospital emergency rooms, provided the benefits of 21st-century medicine to people who never had access to it, and created thousands of jobs in metropolitan regions. Unlike Republican members of Congress, mayors do not have luxury of fighting ideological cage matches with politicians of different persuasions until they can cudgel them into submission with an ill-advised, hastily crafted bill to replace reforms pulled together by a Democratic African American president. If Obamacare had been...

Amid ACA Debate, Maine Inches Closer to Expanding Medicaid

If state lawmakers fail to act, Mainers will vote in November on whether to expand coverage for low-income people.

AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty
AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty Governor Paul LePage delivers the State of the State address to the Legislature, Tuesday, February 7, 2017, at the State House in Augusta, Maine. M aine Governor Paul LePage has been never a fan of the Affordable Care Act’s Medicaid expansion provisions, which he has long criticized as too costly. State lawmakers have disagreed, passing bills to expand Medicaid five times during LePage’s six-year tenure. The cranky Republican vetoed every one, and despite bipartisan support for the original proposals, the legislature has never mustered the votes to override his vetoes. Maine remains one of 19 states that have declined to accept new federal dollars to extend health insurance to more low-income people. Exasperated by LePage’s opposition and the obstinacy of a small group of House Republicans, Mainers for Health Care, a statewide coalition of more than 100 health care, social services, and other organizations, has decided to bypass Augusta. In October, the...

Cities Fill Global Void Left by Trump

American cities strive to maintain longstanding international ties in a bid to stave off the effects of the White House’s scorched-earth policies.

(Photo: AP/Teresa Crawford)
(Photo: AP/Teresa Crawford) Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel on January 24, 2017 W hen the mayors of Mexico City, Ciudad Juarez, and Guadalajara recently traveled to the United States to discuss the fallout from the Trump administration’s immigration policies, they did not go to Washington to speak with White House officials or members of Congress. Instead, they headed to Chicago to meet with Mayor Rahm Emanuel to discuss what the four cities could do to assist families, individuals, and businesses confronting the swift policy shift. Chicago is just one of many U.S. cities, including New York, Los Angeles, and smaller regional hubs like Austin, Houston, Boston, Miami, and San Francisco, that cultivate and maintain global relationships. Such cities all have their distinctive, economic, political, and social niches in the United States. But they also have their own distinctive leverage in international affairs, courtesy of links that imbue city leaders with unprecedented influence at a time...

Dakota Access Pipeline Fight May Open New Chapter of Indian-Federal Conflict

The president’s signature on an executive order could reignite the clashes between Native Americans and their supporters—and their historic adversaries.

AP Photo/David Goldman
AP Photo/David Goldman Military veterans and Native American tribal elders come to a stop for a ceremonial prayer during a march to a closed bridge across from the Dakota Access oil pipeline site in Cannon Ball, North Dakota, Monday, December 5, 2016. D onald Trump hung a portrait of Andrew Jackson in the Oval Office on the same day that he signed an executive order to expedite construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline. The chilling symbolism of giving pride of place to the man who presided over the Cherokees’ expulsion from their Eastern lands in one of the largest forced migrations of America’s indigenous people was hard to miss. The Army Corps of Engineers followed up on the order by granting an easement to the Energy Transfer Partners, the company behind the pipeline project, to complete the last segment of the $3.8 billion, nearly 1,200-mile underground project. The construction gets back on track just as protests spread nationwide from the North Dakota homelands of the Standing...

States Have Real Election Problems. Voter Fraud Isn’t One of Them.

State election officials want to see Washington help out with their real issues or get out of their polling booths.

AP Photo/Nick Ut, file
AP Photo/Nick Ut Los Angeles residents vote at Kenter Canyon Elementary School on November 8, 2016. P resident Donald Trump’s inflammatory immigration executive order promises to command headlines for the foreseeable future. But he appears to have backed away, at least for the moment , from issuing a directive to launch a federal investigation into voter fraud, a national scandal in his own mind if not in reality. It is unclear whether Trump plans to wait for attorney general nominee Jeff Sessions to officially arrive on the scene or for a more fortuitous time to inject additional mayhem into what was a frayed but functioning system of government before he took office. Trump apparently believes in voter fraud, but voter fraud in the United States is all but nonexistent. Loyola Law Professor Justin Levitt’s survey of federal elections from 2000 through 2012 uncovered 31 alleged (not confirmed) instances of voter impersonation out of more than one billion votes cast. Affronted by the...

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