Harold Meyerson

Harold Meyerson is the executive editor of The American ProspectHis email is hmeyerson@prospect.org.

Recent Articles

Censuring Donald Trump

A national campaign goes public in the Times.

AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta
AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta President Donald Trump speaks at the Eisenhower Executive Office Building in Washington I n the front section of the print edition of today’s New York Times —on page A13 in the version printed for the Washington, D.C., area, and for all I know, in other areas, too—a full-page ad appears with the headline “Censure Donald Trump.” Beneath the headline are 34 grounds for censure that the 57,000 signatories to this campaign are telling Congress are more than sufficient cause for the House and Senate to pass censure resolutions condemning the president. At the bottom the page, readers are directed to a website— www.censuredonaldtrump.com —where they can add their names to the petition. In the current political climate, censure is something of a halfway house between impeachment—which only a fraction of Democratic senators and representatives support, fearing it would both eclipse all other battles and energize the right—and the individual statements of...

Paul Booth, 1943-2018

Jobs With Justice
Jobs With Justice Paul Booth with Jobs With Justice Executive Director Sarita Gupta at the group's 2008 conference in Providence, Rhode Island S ix days ago, I was having an email exchange with the author of a piece I was editing on how Democrats can both turn out their base and reach out to voters outside their base in the 2018 midterms. We were going back and forth on three points in the piece—chiefly, on whether Latinos could be said to have realigned themselves more toward the Democrats during the 1990s (the author’s position) or whether so many new Latino voters came forth during that decade that their Democratic shift was more a surge than a realignment (my position). After dredging up the exit poll percentages from the California gubernatorial elections of 1990, 1994, and 1998, and doing the numerical calculations (candidate preference percentage times Latino share of the electorate times raw number of votes cast) to come up with the steadily declining number of Latino votes...

Trump's Anti-Immigrant Racism Has a Long, Ugly History

Cheriss May/Sipa via AP Images
Cheriss May/Sipa via AP Images President Donald Trump speaking in the East Room of the White House W ith each passing day, the Trump administration looks more and more like a replay of the 1920s racist, nativist far right. Trump’s latest infamy, his shithole sonata, almost faithfully recreates the Klan-fed sentiment that gave rise to the Johnson-Reed Immigration Act of 1924, which created a quota system for immigrants that greatly favored those from northern, “Nordic” Europe. (It did this by admitting immigrants according to the national-origin breakdown of immigrants in the 1890 census—thereby favoring immigrants from the United Kingdom and Germany, and all but excluding Jews, Italians, Slavs, and other undesirables, while totally excluding Asians, Latin Americans, and Africans.) Representative Albert Johnson, the bill’s co-author, was a member in good standing of the Klan, but you didn’t actually have to buy a sheet to believe in Nordic superiority. The 1916 pseudo-scientific...

Is Manufacturing’s Future All Used Up?

Though the efforts to revive our much shrunken industrial sector may seem quixotic, manufacturing still matters to the nation’s economy—and its psyche.

Public Domain When Los Angeles had decently-paid workers: Vultee Aviation plant in World War II. In later years, the factory worked on NASA's Apollo and Space Shuttle projects, then closed. Making It: Why Manufacturing Still Matters By Louis Uchitelle The New Press This article appears in the Winter 2018 issue of The American Prospect magazine. Subscribe here . O f all the titans of our new Gilded Age, the only one to attain the status of culture hero was—and still is—Steve Jobs. This wasn’t simply a function of his personal magnetism, though he certainly outshone such apparently amiable schlubs as Bill Gates and Mark Zuckerberg, and the cipher that is Jeff Bezos. It was also because, unlike his fellow creators of cyberspace, Jobs produced the tactile, palpable portals into cyberspace. He made things—handheld objects that changed people’s lives. And yet, few of his fans think of Jobs as a manufacturer. Certainly, his biographer, Water Isaacson, doesn’t. In his lengthy 2011 biography...

The First Thanksgiving, Trickle-Down Version

(AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
(AP Photo/Evan Vucci) Donald Trump pardons Drumstick during the National Thanksgiving Turkey Pardoning Ceremony at the White House on November 21, 2017. trickle-downers.jpg A nd it came to pass that in their second year in the New Land, the Pilgrims enjoyed a bountiful harvest. Some said that it was the Savage Indians who taught the Pilgrims which crops would flourish in the New Land’s Strange Soil, though others disputed that (see-eth below). And it came to pass that to celebrate the harvest, the Leader of the Pilgrims, Venerable Donald, also known to his Pilgrim Brothers as “the Shining Hairpiece on the Hill,” decreed a Feast of Thanksgiving. And both the Pilgrims and the Savage Indians brought heaping portions of food to Venerable Donald to distribute for the Feast. “Cook it well,” Venerable Donald commanded. “When I eat-eth turkey, I like it well cooked.” “And when thou grab-eth pussy, thou likest it rare?” piped up Goody Wiseacre, whom the Pilgrims burned for her Witchery the...

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