Justin Miller

 Justin Miller is a writing fellow for The American Prospect.

Recent Articles

Paul Ryan: Trickle Downer of the Week

The House Speaker’s ACA “replacement” is not a health care plan; it’s a Reverse-Robin-Hood scheme that takes from the poor and gives to the rich.  

(AP/J. Scott Applewhite) Paul Ryan uses his trusty charts and graphs to make his case for the GOP's long-awaited plan to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act. I f it wasn’t clear before, it is now: there is perhaps nothing that Speaker of the House Paul Ryan wouldn’t do to secure massive tax cuts for the rich. That includes repealing a health care law that’s secured coverage for tens of millions of previously uninsured Americans. Last week, Ryan unveiled his long-awaited replacement plan for the Affordable Care Act—the plainly named American Health Care Act. But it’s a bit of a stretch to describe it as health-care legislation. As has been widely reported now, the CBO estimates that the AHCA will cause 24 million people to lose coverage over the next decade—14 million of them in the next year alone. In reality, the AHCA is an upward redistribution scheme that takes from the poor and gives to the rich. Repealing Obamacare will generate some $883 billion in tax cuts over the next...

Emboldened by Trump, Minimum-Wage-Hike Opponents Fight Back

In a direct repudiation of voters, the business lobby and state Republicans (and some Democrats) are trying to undermine minimum wage increases. 

(AP/Rick Scuteri) Arizona Republican Gov. Doug Ducey presents his 2016 State of the State address, in Phoenix, Ariz. Ducey led the charge calling on cities and towns to "put the brakes" on plans to raise the minimum wage or mandate other employment regulations such paid sick leave. O ne of the few bright spots for liberals on Election Day was that voters in four states —Arizona, Colorado, Maine, and Washington—approved ballot measures to raise their minimum wages. The ballot wins proved, once again, that, when put directly before voters, progressive economic policies like increasing the minimum wage are wildly popular—even in red states. The business lobby, however, isn’t letting the will of the people get in its way. Chambers of commerce, restaurant organizations, and other opponents of a livable wage have launched lawsuits challenging the constitutionality of the Arizona and Washington ballot measures and have embarked on heavy-handed lobbying campaigns in Maine to convince friendly...

Kevin Brady: Trickle Downer of the Week

The House Ways and Means chair wants American consumers to pay for massive corporate tax cuts. 

AP/Susan Walsh House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Rep. Kevin Brady, R-Texas., speaks during an interview with The Associated Press on Capitol Hill. S peaker of the House Paul Ryan has an ambitious plan to dramatically remake the American tax system—and in doing so, give out massive tax breaks to powerful corporations and the wealthy. Ryan’s plan is unadulterated trickle-down economics, sending 99.6 percent of the tax cut savings to the top 1 percent of American taxpayers. At the same time, it slashes the corporate tax rate from 35 percent to 20 percent. To pay for those mammoth corporate tax cuts, Ryan and the GOP’s top tax writer, House Ways and Means Chairman Kevin Brady, are hawking a “border adjustment” tax (BAT) that would levy what is essentially a tariff on imports and a rebate on exports. One analysis finds that the proposal would raise about $1.2 trillion in revenue over 10 years, though that’s likely still not enough to cover the cost of the business tax cuts. What is...

Puzder’s Out, But Acosta Raises Questions

Trump’s new, more-traditional labor secretary nominee is still a hardline conservative—and labor advocates have questions. 

AP/Alan Diaz Former U.S. Attorney R. Alexander Acosta talks to reporters during a news conference in Miami, in 2008. L ess than 24 hours after celebrating former labor secretary nominee Andy Puzder’s withdrawal, labor advocates are now scrambling to get up to speed on Trump’s new nominee, Alexander Acosta, officially nominated at a press conference Thursday afternoon. President Trump announced that he thinks Acosta will make a “tremendous secretary of labor,” but made no mention of Puzder’s failed nomination. On the surface, the administration seems to have learned its lesson after putting forward a controversial fast-food executive with a long record of incendiary anti-worker comments and a hostile view of government regulations. Puzder’s nomination was met with broad-based opposition from progressive advocacy and labor groups, who saw him as a nominee directly at odds with the mission of the labor department, and a finger in the eye—rather than a champion—of working people. Acosta,...

Jeb Hensarling: Trickle Downer of the Week

Wall Street’s favorite congressman wants to gut consumer protections. 

Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call/AP Chairman Jeb Hensarling runs the House Financial Services Committee meeting to organize for the 115th Congress on Feb. 2, 2017. T he Consumer Financial Protection Bureau’s aggressive regulatory and enforcement mission, crafted as a part of the Dodd-Frank financial reforms, has long drawn the ire of congressional Republicans who are eager undermine its power and independence—and with a deregulatory fanatic as president, they may now have their best shot. Leading that charge is House Financial Services Committee Chairman Jeb Hensarling, whose Wall Street deregulation bill—the Financial CHOICE Act—forms the GOP’s blueprint for winding back Dodd-Frank. In a memo obtained by The New York Times last week, Hensarling outlined his plan to eviscerate the CFPB’s power. In a follow-up interview this week, the Texas congressman called the CFPB a “rogue, unconstitutional” agency. “I want to protect consumers from the Orwellian-named Consumer Finance Protection Bureau—...

Pages