Justin Miller

 Justin Miller is a senior writing fellow for The American Prospect.

Recent Articles

The GOP’s Overtime Reform Plan: Fraud Masquerading as Flexibility

With Obama’s landmark overtime expansion blocked in the courts, conservatives roll out a plan that would undo overtime pay as we know it. 

(CQ Roll Call via AP Images) Rep. Martha Roby, R-Ala., and Sen. Mike Lee, R-Utah, hold a news conference in the Capitol to announce the introduction of the "Working Families Flexibility Act," on Wednesday, Jan. 21, 2015. trickle-downers.jpg A mid endless political cacophony in Washington, D.C., House Republicans are quietly advancing legislation that would drive a freight train through a central tenet of New Deal-era labor law: overtime. Earlier this year, Republicans introduced the Working Families Flexibility Act , a bill that would amend the Fair Labor Standards Act to allow private-sector employers to offer workers comp time instead of the premium time-and-a-half pay for overtime hours worked. As the bill proposes, workers would have the option to get an hour and a half of paid time off in the future instead of cash for every hour of overtime worked—an option that public-sector employers have been able to offer since the 1980s as a means for cutting costs. Labor advocates say that...

Gary Cohn’s Glass-Steagall Support Is a Trickle-Down Trojan Horse

Trump’s top economic adviser—our Trickle Downer of the Week—is veiling his support for more deregulation behind the rhetoric of financial reform. 

(Associated Press) Gary Cohn, director of the U.S. National Economic Council, arrives to a swearing in ceremony of White House senior staff in the East Room of the White House in Washington, D.C. L ast week, reports surfaced that Gary Cohn—the White House’s top economic adviser, former president and chief operating officer of Goldman Sachs, and purported foil to Steve Bannon’s “economic” nationalism—said in a closed-door meeting with the Senate Banking Committee that he supports legislation that would cordon off Wall Street’s speculative investment from commercial banking operations. That is, he supports some form of reinstatement of Glass-Steagall, the landmark Depression-era financial regulation law that forbade commercial banks from engaging in risky speculative investments. Congress passed and Bill Clinton signed the repeal in 1999, a move that helped lay the groundwork for the Wall Street-fueled economic meltdown in 2008. Naturally, you might question whether Trump’s Wall Street...

Mark Meadows Wants the AHCA to Take Even More from the Poor

The House Freedom Caucus leader—our Trickle Downer of the Week—wants to allow states to undo preexisting condition protections and thin out health-care coverage, exacerbating the deep policy inequities of the AHCA. 

(CQ Roll Call via AP Images) Rep. Mark Meadows, R-N.C., chairman of the House Freedom Caucus, walks through Statuary Hall in the Capitol on Wednesday, March 22, 2017. B ut seriously—there is nothing Republicans won’t do to secure tax cuts for the rich. It was only two weeks ago that the GOP’s effort to repeal and replace Obamacare (after seven years of presumable preparation) ended in complete failure, leaving Speaker Paul Ryan to meekly state, “Doing big things is hard.” Trump and congressional Republicans seemed content to leave the American Health Care Act’s wreckage in their rearview mirror as they headed for greener, seemingly less divisive, pastures: tax reform. That now seems to have been a head fake. Last week, party leaders revealed that the Obamacare repeal is back on the table and negotiations are again under way—an indication that Ryan knows the only way to make his steep tax cuts revenue-neutral is to first repeal Obamacare , and that he is ready to accede to even more...

Fight for 15 and Black Lives Matter Join Forces on Anniversary of MLK's Death

Forty-nine years after King was assassinated, the left’s organizing vanguards seek to continue his work. 

(Mike Brown/The Commercial Appeal via AP) Christopher Smith, right, leads chants during a protest for higher wages for fast food workers outside a McDonald's in Memphis, Tenn., Thursday, April 14, 2016. O n the April 4, 1968, Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was gunned down on the balcony of the Lorraine Motel in Memphis, Tennessee, where he had come to support the city’s striking sanitation workers, virtually all of them African American. The workers were embroiled in a heated labor dispute with the city government over low wages, dangerous working conditions, and its unyielding opposition to recognizing their union. Forty-nine years later, much has changed, yet much more has stayed the same. Despite landmark advancements in civil rights, black Americans still face staggering levels of systemic social and economic inequities and rampant state-sanctioned violence and discrimination. Black men are three times more likely to be killed by police than white men, and are incarcerated at...

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