Blogs

Blogs

Paul Waldman

Harvey Weinstein, Donald Trump, and the (Sometimes) Beneficial Politics of Reaction

Richard Shotwell/Invision/AP, File
Richard Shotwell/Invision/AP, File Producer Harvey Weinstein participates in the War and Peace panel at the A&E 2016 Winter TCA in Pasadena, California. L et's take a moment to thank Donald Trump for opening so many eyes—OK, so many men's eyes—to the reality of sexual harassment and assault that women continue to live with. That may sound strange, but it's entirely possible that had Trump not been elected, particularly after being caught on tape bragging about his ability to assault women with impunity, Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein wouldn't have had his long history of repellent behavior revealed. And that's after Roger Ailes was exposed last year for doing similar things, as was Bill O'Reilly. We're at a moment where awareness of the reality of sexual coercion in the workplace is reaching levels we haven't seen before, and it's partly because we're living not only in the age of Trump, but in the age of reaction to Trump. The spectacle of this man being president changes...

The Personal Presidency

(Shawn Thew/picture-alliance/dpa/AP Images)
(Shawn Thew/picture-alliance/dpa/AP Images) Trump walks to board Marine One on the South Lawn ofthe White House on October 7, 2017. P olitical scientists will tell you that we spend too much time worrying about personality in politics. All those stories in every presidential campaign —about the advice one candidate's grandpappy gave him down at the fishin' hole or what the other candidate's taste in music says about her—they're mostly irrelevant. What matters much more, not just for how elections turn out but for what happens between them, is larger, broader forces and institutions: the state of the economy, durable electoral and policy coalitions, the nature of partisanship, and so on. The personal stuff might be interesting, but its effects are only seen at the margins. In some ways, those buzzkilling political scientists doing their best to render politics dry and uninteresting are unquestionably correct. Impersonal forces have enormous effects, and the further back you set your...

Is There Any Problem Tax Cuts for the Wealthy Can't Solve?

(AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite) House Speaker Paul Ryan and Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy speak following a closed-door GOP strategy session at the Republican National Committee Headquarters on Capitol Hill on September 26, 2017. C hris Rock had a routine in which he described how when he was a kid, the only health care his father offered for any ailment was Robitussin. Asthma? Robitussin. Cancer? Robitussin. "I broke my leg, Daddy poured Robitussin on it." Tax cuts are the Republican Party's Robitussin. Whatever you think ails the country's economy, if not its very spirit, tax cuts will fix it. Slow GDP growth? Tax cuts. Slow wage growth? Tax cuts. Long-term productivity declines? Tax cuts. Inequality? Tax cuts. And of course by "tax cuts," we mean tax cuts for corporations and the wealthy. What's remarkable about this isn't only that it's justified with a shameless combination of magical thinking and outright lies (more on that in a moment). Most striking of all is the utter lack of...