Harold Meyerson

Harold Meyerson is executive editor of The American Prospect. His email is hmeyerson@prospect.org.

Recent Articles

How California Hopes to Undo Trump

America’s mega-state is now clearly its leftmost, too—and on social insurance, climate change, and immigrant rights, it has more capacity and desire to defeat Republican reaction than any other institution.

Ronen Tierny/Sipa via AP Images
This article appears in the Spring 2017 issue of The American Prospect magazine. Subscribe here . Spasms of fear often shake California, a state prey to earthquakes, fires, and floods. One such spasm—a manmade one—is shaking the state today. Business is down at groceries featuring Mexican and Central American food, and at other stores catering to an immigrant clientele. The possibility of stakeouts by Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents has led thousands of Angelenos to abbreviate their daily rounds. “Since Election Day, children are scared about what might happen to their parents,” says Angelica Salas, executive director of the Coalition for Humane Immigration Rights of Los Angeles. “And parents for their children. We fill out at least ten guardianship letters every day for [undocumented] parents who fear for their [U.S. citizen] kids if they—the parents—are deported.” The fear is rooted in the grim reality of the new president...

The Cosmological and Temporal Implications of the GOP Tax Cut in the AHCA

AP Photo/Andrew Harnik
We fail to appreciate the depth of thought that has gone into House Speaker Paul Ryan’s bill repealing and replacing the Affordable Care Act, which may be brought to a vote today if there are enough Republican votes to pass it. Well, not the original, pre-amendment bill, which would reduce the number of Americans with health insurance by 24 million and cut taxes on the wealthiest Americans by nearly half a trillion dollars over the next decade. No, what’s elevated the bill to the forefront of contemporary physics is an amendment pushed by House Ways and Means Committee Chair Kevin Brady, a Texas Republican. Ryan’s original legislation repealed the 3.8 percent tax that Obamacare imposed on capital gains, dividend, and interest income for individuals with annual incomes of $200,00 or higher, or families with annual incomes of $250,000 or more, which Obamacare’s authors put into the legislation to help fund the ACA subsidies and Medicaid expansion. In the original...

The Media Bias Against a Decent Minimum Wage

trickle-downers.jpg Despite abundant empirical evidence that raising the minimum wage doesn’t lead to job loss, the idea that it does is an article of faith among right-wing economists, and all too often the media report their theological musings as fact. The latest example of such folly popped up in an article in the March 22 Financial Times , a paper that usually knows better than to publish this bushwah. Here’s how the piece, headlined “Battle in Seattle to find employment,” began: In Seattle, the city’s unemployment rate remains steady, at a little over 3 percent even though a rising minimum wage may have driven out low-paying jobs. “We think the immigrant workers are heading to lower-cost regions of the country,” says Jacob Vigdor, an economist at Washington University. [ sic—Washington University is in St. Louis. Vigdor is an economist at the University of Washington, in Seattle. ] “Natives of the Seattle area have also...

How the Democrats Can Hijack the Tax Reform Debate

Just in case they want an economic policy, here’s one they can win on.

AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite
trickle-downers.jpg What with the president’s war on immigrants, his travel ban, his Putinphilia, his threats to Obamacare, and his cabinet picks, congressional Democrats have spent most of the last month busily saying “No,” with the occasional “Maybe” thrown in by some red-state senators. What congressional Democrats haven’t done is propose some serious alternatives to the economic policies that Trump and congressional Republicans are poised to inflict on the (partly wary, partly unsuspecting) nation. And that’s a mistake. Not right now, perhaps. To some degree, the Democrats’ strategy has to be guided by the same criteria as an ER physician: the most urgent cases first. As well, as my colleague Paul Waldman argued on Monday , the 2018 elections, like all midterms, will largely be about mobilizing one’s base, and nothing stirs the Democratic base these days like opposing Donald Trump in every way possible. Standing up and saying...

The Case for Keith

(Photo: AP/Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)
In normal circumstances, the men and women who chair the Democratic and Republican National Committees labor in a rather just obscurity. As the state and local party organizations of the late 19th and early 20th centuries withered and dissolved before a host of challenges—a national welfare state, television advertising, the rise of primaries and the fall of conventions—the role of the national party chairperson shrank to that of exalted fundraiser. Prominent chairs are now the exception, not the rule. It took hacked emails to give Debby Wasserman Schultz her 15 minutes of notoriety, while Reince Priebus emerged from some dank hole only because he was one of the few Republican officials last spring to stand by Donald Trump. Closer to the norm of anonymity is Preibus’s new replacement at the RNC, Ronna Romney McDaniel. That there is now a hotly contested race for the post of chair of the DNC is only further evidence that the Democratic Party is in an odd kind of...

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