Justin Miller

Justin Miller is a former Prospect writing fellow and is currently covering politics for the Texas Observer

Recent Articles

With Gawker Successfully Unionized, Is Salon Next?

Just weeks after Gawker's announcement, Salon staffers announce plans to unionize. 

Everett Historical/Shutterstock
Everett Historical/Shutterstock T he editorial staff for Salon Media, a progressive news and analysis outlet, unanimously announced in a letter today that they intend to unionize with the Writers Guild of America, East. “Every single one of the editorial employees at Salon supports unionizing with the Writers Guild of America, East, and today we’re asking the management of Salon to recognize our union,” the letter states. “We are doing this because we believe in our publication and want it to be successful. We’re especially proud to work for a media organization that has championed progressive values for nearly 20 years. We believe this organizing campaign is a positive and public way for us to put those values into practice, right here at home.” The announcement comes just weeks after 100 editorial staffers at Gawker Media successfully voted to unionize with the Writers Guild of America, East (WGAE), notably with the support of management . It appears that Salon staffers—26 in total—...

First Gawker, Now Salon Staffers Announce Plan to Unionize

The union drives may signal a turning point for digital media. 

Everett Historical/Shutterstock
Everett Historical/Shutterstock T he editorial staff for Salon Media, a progressive news and analysis outlet, unanimously announced in a letter today that they intend to unionize with the Writers Guild of America, East. “Every single one of the editorial employees at Salon supports unionizing with the Writers Guild of America, East, and today we’re asking the management of Salon to recognize our union,” the letter states. “We are doing this because we believe in our publication and want it to be successful. We’re especially proud to work for a media organization that has championed progressive values for nearly 20 years. We believe this organizing campaign is a positive and public way for us to put those values into practice, right here at home.” The announcement comes just weeks after 100 editorial staffers at Gawker Media successfully voted to unionize with the Writers Guild of America, East (WGAE), notably with the support of management . It appears that Salon staffers—26 in total—...

Why It's so Hard to Regulate Fracking

A long-awaited EPA study illustrates how industry can sidestep meaningful reform. 

AP Photo/Brennan Linsley
AP Photo/Brennan Linsley In this March 25, 2014 photo, a worker oils a pump during a hydraulic fracturing operation at an Encana Corp. well pad near Mead, Colorado. I n early June, the Environmental Protection Agency released a long-awaited study on the impact of hydraulic fracturing on drinking water. A press release for the report said that there was no evidence of widespread contamination from fracking. However, there were “potential vulnerabilities in the water lifecycle that could impact drinking water.” Observers quickly came to wildly different conclusions. Environmental groups say it’s concrete evidence that fracking can contaminate groundwater. The oil and gas industry says the report validates its stance that fracking is largely safe. Hydraulic fracturing, better known as fracking, is the process of drilling into shale formations and injecting a cocktail of water, sand, and chemicals to create tiny fractures that access pockets of oil and natural gas. The process has helped...

With Oregon's Bill, Paid Sick Leave Gains Momentum

How Oregon became the fourth state to mandate paid sick leave. 

Doug Geisler
Doug Geisler B uilding on a strong and growing level of momentum nationwide, on Friday, the Oregon legislature passed a bill that mandates paid sick leave. Governor Kate Brown, a progressive Democrat, is sure to sign the bill, making Oregon the fourth state to pass mandated paid sick leave. The vote is a significant win for a nationwide movement that’s been quietly gaining steam among cities, states, and presidential candidates in recent years. It’s also coming not a moment too soon. Half of the Oregon’s private sector workers don’t have access to paid sick leave; about 80 percent of the state’s low-wage workers are without it—this legislation will mandate access for somewhere north of 500,000 Oregon workers. The bill mandates that employers with more than 10 workers must offer up to five days of paid sick leave; businesses with less than 10 employees still must provide protected sick leave, though it may be unpaid. Both full-time and part-time workers are covered. The success in...

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